HAVING A NEAR-MEAT EXPERIENCE?

Before you give in to the temptation of that smoking hunk of meat, give us a call, toll-free. We’re here to help..

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Eat Less Meat. Save More Wildlife.

EAT LESS MEAT.

SAVE MORE WILDLIFE.

Cutting just one-third of the meat from your diet can significantly reduce your environmental footprint.

TAKE THE PLEDGE.
Eat Less Meat. Save More Wildlife.

WHAT IS AN EARTH-FRIENDLY DIET?

By choosing more plant-based meals, you can save water, land, emissions and wildlife. You can make a difference with every meal and snack.

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What is an Earth-friendly Diet?

COST TO WILDLIFE

Wild animals suffer not only the collateral damage of meat-related deforestation, drought, pollution and climate change, but also direct targeting by the meat industry.

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wildlife

WILDLIFE SHAREABLES

Want to spread the message about taking extinction off your plate but not sure where to start? It’s easier than you may think — and it can be fun.

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Wildlife Shareables

The planet and its wildlife need us to reduce our meat consumption.

The planet and its wildlife need us to reduce our meat consumption. Take the pledge to eat less meat and save more wildlife.

Credits

 

Meat production is one of the main drivers of environmental degradation globally, and the crisis is rapidly growing worse.

 

That’s why the Center for Biological Diversity launched our Earth-friendly Diet campaign.

How Meat Consumption Threatens the Environment

Livestock vs. Wildlife

From wolves to elk to prairie dogs, wild animals pay the price of meat production. Some are killed because they prey on cows; others die en masse to make room for agricultural operations; still more are put in harm’s way by pollution and greenhouse gas emissions that exacerbate climate change.

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Climate Change

According to the United Nations, meat production is responsible for 14.5 percent — and, according to some studies, as much as 51 percent — of global greenhouse gas emissions, which is more than all forms of transportation combined. Nearly 60 percent of the carbon footprint of the average U.S. household diet comes from animal products.

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Habitat Loss, Water Use and Pollution

The 500 million tons of manure produced annually by U.S. livestock is just the beginning: Animal agriculture has taken over nearly half the landmass of the lower 48 states. And it has polluted 35,000 miles of rivers in 22 states and groundwater in 17 states.

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Why we need to rewild our plates today

Production of beef, poultry, pork and other meats tripled between 1980 and 2010 and will likely double again by 2050. This ever-increasing meat consumption in a world of more than 7 billion people is already taking a staggering toll on wildlife, habitat, water resources, air quality and the climate. The only way to stop this environmental crisis is to address both unsustainable population growth and our voracious appetite for meat — and Americans eat more meat per capita than almost anyone else. By eating less or no meat, we can take extinction off our plates and improve our own health along with the health of the planet.